Spring Nymph of the Wirer Spring

Spring Nymph of the Wirer Spring

In the courtyard of the Museum of the Township of Bad Ischl, Esplanade 10, at the passage from the esplanade to the Kurpark garden


Place

Place

In 1835 and from 1839 to 1841, Dr. Wirer rebuilt the spring at Wirerquellgasse, named it after himself, and used its water for spa use. The spring, which was used a lot in Wirer's time and even afterwards, dried up around 1880.

Above the spring on a pedestal, there was originally a sculpture of a medium-sized striding nymph in flowing robes with an amphora on her shoulder. Now the sculpture is on the above-mentioned Denckstein, which was lined with concrete in 1981. The sculpture was apparently originally painted ochre and sprinkled with sand, giving the impression of a figure carved out of sandstone.

The spring’s tapping was largely demolished in 1940, and in 1950 a building was built at the plot (Wirerquellgasse 18). Two remnants of the old, elaborate, and often depicted spring tapping found their way into the museum:  a stone slab with the market’s coat of arms and the year 1619 (from an old spring tapping), and the cast zinc statue of a Naiad that had been erected by Wirer in 1841.

During the restoration in 2018 initiated by Cultural Heritage Society of Bad Ischl (Ischler Heimatverein) the original appearance of the nymph was restored as best as possible.